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Commissioned Work
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Monotypes
 

Scroll to the bottom of the page to find out how I made these images.
   
Click images for a larger view.
 
To make a purchase, visit the Contact page.

Figures and Portraits

knee.jpg
Almost Tsa Lung
12.5 x 17 in.
1992
Retail: NFS

starklyshe1992.jpg

Starkly She
29 x 19 in.
1992
Retail: $200

one.jpg

One
paper: 20 x 15 in.
image: 9 x 11 in.
1991
Retail: $200

recliningwoman.jpg

Reclining Woman
15 x 22.5 in.
1992
Retail: $150

darkwoman1992.jpg

dark woman
15 x 17 in.
1992
Retail: $75

violetwoman.jpg

Violet Woman
12.5 x 17 in.
1991
Retail: $150

bluewoman.jpg

Blue Woman
15 x 21 in.
Monotype and Ink Wash
1992
Retail: $200

portraitofunknownwoman.jpg

Portrait of Unknown Woman
15 x 22 in.
1992
Retail: $150

woman.jpg

across her
12.5 x 17 in.
1992
Retail: NFS

mikebackus1992.jpg

Mike Backus' P-day
12.5 x 17 in.
1992
Retail: $125
   

The Between Series

washingofwater1993.jpg

In the Washing of the Water
paper: 25 x 19.5 in.
image 22.5 x 15.5 in.
1993
Retail: $175
onlytheragewouldfloat.jpg
Only the Rage Would Float
paper: 25 x 19.5 in.
image 22.5 x 15.5 in.
1993
Retail: $175

mybodyanorchestra1993.jpg

My Body an Orchestra
paper: 25 x 19.5 in.
image 22.5 x 15.5 in.
1993
Retail: $175

hungryghosts.jpg

Hungry Ghosts
paper: 25 x 19.5 in.
image 22.5 x 15.5 in.
1993
Retail: $175

behindhim1993.jpg

Behind Him
paper: 25 x 19.5 in.
image 22.5 x 15.5 in.
1993
Retail: $175

doorwaytoshadow.jpg

Doorway to Shadow
paper: 25 x 19.5 in.
image 22.5 x 15.5 in.
1993
Retail: $175

drumsforjon1992.jpg

Drums for Jon
paper: 25 x 19.5 in.
image 22.5 x 15.5 in.
1993
Retail: $175

waitingforthethinman1993.jpg

Waiting for the Thin Man
paper: 25 x 19.5 in.
image 22.5 x 15.5 in.
1993
Retail: $175

beyondtheveil1993.jpg

Beyond the Veil
paper: 25 x 19.5 in.
image 22.5 x 15.5 in.
1993
Retail: $150

Head Series

headiii.jpg

Head III
paper: 30 x 22 in.
image 21.5 x 15.5 in.
1993
Retail: $150

headii1993.jpg

Head IV
paper: 29 x 22 in.
image 21.5 x 15.5 in.
1993
Retail: $150

London Series

natalieonthewaytowindsor.jpg

Natalie on the Way to Windsor
25.5 x 22 in.
1992
Retail: $150

inthecourtauld.jpg

In the Courtauld
15.5 x 22 in.
1992
Retail: $175

bloomsburytrenchcoat1992.jpg

Bloomsbury Trenchcoat
15.5 x 22 in.
1992
Retail: $250

threemenunderground.jpg

Three Men Underground
15.5 x 22 in.
1992
Retail: $150

drunkdancingtobuskersatleicestersquare.jpg

Drunk Dancing to Buskers in Leicester Square:
"You just gotta move your feet like this..."
15.5 x 22 in.
1992
Retail: $150

lyndonantcliffwaitinginleicestersquare.jpg

Lyndon Antcliff Waiting in Leicester Square
15.5 x 22 in.
1992
Retail: $150

christianthielackerparisspring1991.jpg

Christian Theilacker, Paris, Spring 1991
15.5 x 22 in.
1992
Retail: $250
alwayswalkingaboutbloomsburyman1992.jpg
Always Walking about Bloomsbury Man
15.5 x 22 in.
1992
Retail: $125

Making Monotypes
 
I created these monotypes by applying ink to a flat beveled plexiglass plate with brayers (rollers) and brushes. I manipulate the ink by adding and subtracting it with brushes, cloths, solvent, or any item that will produce the desired effect, creating subtle textures in the process.  Once the image is created, I carefully place a sheet of water-saturated and blotted rag paper over the beveled plate, cover the paper with blotting paper and a layer of felt, and finally run the whole thing through a roller press.  The ink presses into the paper, and the image comes out in reverse, a single mirror image of the original design.  Hence the name Mono (one) type (print). Sometimes I would run it through again with a fresh sheet of paper to produce a "ghost print," an image much lighter in its ink saturation, but still lovely. 
 
I love the immediacy and freshness of monotyping, and am attracted to it because it is so hard to place in a genre...all at once it is painting, drawing and printmaking. Monotyping has existed for hundreds of years and has been used by many famous artists --Castiglione, William Blake, Degas, Matisse, Mary Cassatt, and Picasso, to name a few-- although few artists have used it as their primary form of expression, possibly because of its generic ambiguity.  I am hoping to figure out a way to start monotyping again, perhaps using a rolling pin, or by converting an old ringer washer I have into a press.

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